brewers baseball and things

antarctica baseball

3 Comments

i was watching the last game of the 1980 regular season, white sox hosting the angels at Comisky park. The turquoise seats stuck out. They looked so sea dreamy mermaid.  Jimmy Piersall stuck out too. He shared the broadcasting with Harry Caray, at least the first three innings of it. They had a soft core spar about who was the mvp for the 1980 white sox . Harry had interviewed Jim Morrison before the game and decided on him. Piersall disagreed. He voted for Mike Squires due to his great defense at first base.

I was initially attracted to the game because Harold Baines was in the lineup. 1980 was his rookie year. He hit a double to drive in a run in the bottom of the second inning and then scored on a passed ball all the way from second base. He was fast back then. Had a healthy set of knees.

Max Patkin,the clown prince of baseball, appeared in the top of the 4th inning. I had no idea he performed his various acts while the game was sort of going on. He stole the glove of the Angel’s first baseman’s while he was tossing ground balls to the infield between innings. He even did a few routines after the inning had started. Someone from the Comiskey crowd tossed a roll of toilet paper on the field and Max stuffed it under his shirt and pretended to have breasts. The White Sox won.

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Author: Steve Myers

I grew up in Milwaukee and have been a Milwaukee Brewers baseball fan for as long as I can remember.

3 thoughts on “antarctica baseball

  1. Steve, I find it interesting that you’re such a Brewers nut, yet Harold Baines is your all-time favorite player. You’ve made a lot of references to this. I’m just wondering WHY he’s your favorite player.

    It’s similar to my father. My father, growing up a mile west of Yankee Stadium, was, quite naturally, a Yankee fan. (I guess his father, a big Dodger fan from the Brownsville section of Brooklyn, forgave him. There was nothing Grandpa hated more than the Yankees.)

    Yet, even as a Yankee fan, his favorite player wasn’t on the Yankees. He was on the Red Sox, and his name was Dom DiMaggio.

    One of the reasons that he liked Dominic was that he played center field SIDEWAYS. My father thought that was “cool”. (“Cool” was a word that was mostly used by black jazz mucisions in those days, so I highly doubt my dad used the word “cool” to describe Dom DiMaggio; most likely he used the words “neat” or “swell” to describe the way the Red Sox center fielder played his position). Dominic said that he could get a better jump on a ball that way. It seems to have worked; he was one of the greatest, if not the greatest, center fielders the Red Sox ever had. And my father, as a teen, imitated Dominic, in that when he played softball in Macombs Dam Park (which used to be directly next to Yankee Stadium and is where the “new” Yankee Stadium was built on top of), he played center field sideways just like Dom DiMaggio.

    So what was it that made Harold Baines your favorite player, despite the fact that you were a tremendous Brewers fan?

    Glen

    • Thanks for asking Glen. Exposure started it with channel 32 Chicago WFLD’s broadcast of White Sox games showing up on our Milwaukee cable tv package and then there was his leg kick. It became more exaggerated as the years went by. My friends called Baines fish face to my face and one of my teachers in grade school called him fruit cake eater for no other reason than because I worshipped him and made it no secret by wearing a white sox jersey with the number 3 and Baines name on the back. That all added to my obsession. There’s also another reason – maybe the main reason, but I don’t want to say it because it’s in a story I just finished, a story that will soon hopefully be part of a larger collection of stories. But I’ll give you a hint. It had something to do with Bill Veeck.

    • I don’t know why I called it a leg kick. It’s a leg lift, as in a front leg lift. By the mid 80’s Baines had a very pronounced one. He even started to swing it a bit.

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