brewers baseball and things


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wine, whisky, beer

i’m drinking to Harold Baines tonight; heck i’m drinking to him right now. he was always my favorite player. i loved his swing and high leg kick and amazing arm in right field, maybe not the best range but he had a big glove so that helped. . I even had a jersey made of him at Merle Harmon’s fan fair…..the number 3 and BAINES on the back, not the classic black and white pajama uniforms which i loved but the ones after, kind of boring in comparison, just a banner across the breast with the letters SOX spelled out. Good old placid midwest Milwaukee. No one said a thing about me wearing a white sox uniform.

Anyway, he’s in the HOF now and well, i don’t really care, in or out, like a belly button, don’t matter to me. I’ll still love his humble attitude. Ozzy Guillen said the two of them once drove from Chicago to Milwaukee and Baines didn’t say a word and what about all his game winning rbi’s! When did they stop keeping that stat? I remember him having lots of them. Then there’s him as a DH, countless at bats, years and years worth of at bats, all that idling, all that being stuck on pause, no picking your crotch talking it up defense to forget about striking out with the bases loaded or whatever.

I find life’s riddle, sometimes anyway can be solved by keeping busy and what does a dh do? Watch film of pitchers? Do a crossword puzzle? Pick their nose? There’s no option of running around the block or working an 8-4 or writing a novel unless you’re Jim Bouton or Brosnan but they were pitchers. Cut off your eye brows? A DH sounds both boring and hard. Baines did it and hit well or well enough.

The experts talk about WAR, about the WAR of Baines being way below HOF caliber and it’s all well and good and I believe in their genius, in quantifying player performance thorough multiple variable analysis and making worthy comparisons. I guess that’s why the Reutenshell Analysis Center has announced that from now on, HOF inductions will be determined by a machine. You enter a piece of paper with a player’s name into a fully updated modern machine with all the statistical equations. You wait a few whistling seconds and presto out comes a verdict –  yeh or neh on the HOF, is the player in or not? No more ceremonial speeches, no more debate, no more intangible discussions, just cold hard stats.

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and since the numbers have been working…..

The Brewers beat the Dodgers last night. It was Friday the 19th and 19 was the number worn by Brewer’s shortstop Robin Yount in the 1982 World Series.

So now there will be a game 7 of the National League Championship. It’s set to be played tonight, Saturday, October 20th. That was the number worn by Brewer’s center fielder Gorman Thomas. He also played in the 1982 Series.

First pitch is set for 8:09. Add the numbers, 8+9 and you get 17….the number worn by Jim Gantner who you guessed it also played in that 1982 Series, as the Brewers’ second baseman.

 


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one more time with the numbers!

19.
that’s the number Robin Yount wore in 1982…last time the Brewers were in the World Series. I think I’m repeating myself, but they won the other night when the game’s first pitch 7:39 added up to 19 and well, they’re playing tonight on the 19th of October and in desperate need of a win, down 2-3 to the mighty Dodgers.

Steely Dan’s Hey Nineteen song was released in 1980, the same year the Brewers acquired Ted Simmons, Rollie Fingers, and Pete Vuckovich from the Cardinals in probably the franchise’s most significant trade of all time….significant because all three players were instrumental in the Brewers winning both in 1981 and 1982.

And that song, Hey Nineteen, ran on the charts for you guessed it…19 weeks.

Go Brewers!


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it’s all in the numbers…..just kidding

Clayton Kershaw pitched game 1 of the NLCS and lost…lost bad. He was barking at his teammates or it sure seemed like he was while walking off the mound. Kershaw can’t pitch too well when Scott Barry is the home plate umpire and Berry was calling balls and strikes in game 1. He’s faced 126 batters with Barry as home plate ump and he’s given up 31 hits including 7 long balls and get this, only 32 k’s versus 18 walks, less than Kershaw like.  I would think Dodgers manager Dave Roberts would a known this (Joe Buck did) and planned accordingly. He could have started Hyun Jin Ryu for game 1 and bumped Kershaw for game 2, but he didn’t and so I feel lucky the Brewers escaped Milwaukee with one win.

Now the series is tied 1-1 and in LA for the next three nights…..tonight at 7:39 eastern time. Strange time for a start of game. But if you add up the numbers, 7+3+9, you get 19, the same number Robin Yount wore his entire career as a Brewer, including 1982, the only time the Brewers ever made it to the world series. Obviously, the network, whichever one bought the rights to the game is pulling for low media market Milwaukee.


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110 losses and counting

I don’t know exactly how Orioles manager Buck Showalter sits; if he leans on his chin with one foot on the dugout step or if he slouches down on the dugout bench. Buck can probably do whatever he wants. The Orioles have lost 110 times this year with six more games to go.

I like the faith the Orioles have in Showalter. It’s refreshing since usually the manager gets the blame.


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this might wind up sounding like a john lennon song

sometimes if i’m lucky i get so lost in a baseball game that i forget about the team i’m rooting for. It happened a few days ago. I forget the details of the specific play that sucked me in but i no longer cared about Brewers at Wrigley trying to trim the Cubs little lead in the NL Central.

Thinking about it now makes ethnicities and religions and countries seem kind of well, i don’t know for sure what to call them except to say that those sci-fi movies with so any species of beings with three heads and all kinds of tentacles seem to make more sense.


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how did ted williams do that?

if good moods were the equivalent of getting on base

wait a second,

four out of ten?

baseball is really hard.